Thursday, January 7, 2010

You can't fix lazy? Can you?

I have 24 student and the same 12-14 keep failing math tests. They do alright on their daily work. Sometimes they have to do papers over, but I pull them into small groups and teach and reteach. They nearly always get their first 3-4 problems correct and then miss everything else. Over the break I gave my math grades to my principal. She gave me some advice, observed me yesterday, and I think we both have the same conclusion ~ they're lazy and they truly don't care. I'm at a loss. I can sit with one of these students and watch them work the problems and they do fine. Then I send them to their seats and the remainder of their work is not like the work I just observed. I had nine kids fail an assessment today. I had seven absent, so that nine was a lot. Shoot, it's always a lot. I gave them practice problems as homework. I gave them a lot. I told them if they do the work and get a good percentage correct then I will give them a passing grade on the assessment. If they choose not to do the work they will sign a statement saying so and it will get sent home in the mail. 


I've always had 2-3 kids like this. But never this many in one class. What really bothers me is that I know they know the work. They just refuse to show it

5 comments:

Kathy said...

Ugh...I am not a teacher, but I feel your pain. Wish I had an answer for you. Way back when the teacher probably would have called the parent and the parent would have given the kid hell. :)

Theresa Milstein said...

I was an extended term sub in fifth-grade a few years ago, and had 11 students on IEPs out of 21. One child was on a 2nd-grade reading level. That was a challenging year.

You might be interested in this thread of comments on this post:

http://www.gladlywoulditeach.com/2010/01/06/combating-slacker-attitudes/

Cathryn said...

I know you will find this funny, but it wasn't until I was an adult and in college that it was realized that I had a math learning dysfunction. I would struggle to get the concepts and finally get them,and be able to do the work. Fifteen minutes later in the math lab, I had to re-learn the class all over again. I couldn't remember what I had learned, struggled through. It was a very terrible time for me since I would know it just before math lab.

Finally one of my professors realized that I had a learning disability in math. It helped me to understand that I needed to work differently in math. And that means lots and lots of repeated procedures. I still don't get it and have to practice the basics over and over again.

(and you're probably shaking your head because I teach college-level statistics--but I don't do math! The computer programs do the math for me!)

Anyway--I don't know if ALL the kids might have this problem, but a few might.

Intense Guy said...

That has got to be frustrating for someone as dedicated as you.

Perhaps its the crazy weather...

Teachinfourth said...

Man, can I relate to this…